What does the “Day of Judgment” mean?

Matthew 11: 20-30;  2 Peter 3: 10-13  

Or as 2 Peter puts it, The “Day of the Lord” which means the Lord’s final Day of Judgment where He settles all accounts and injustices. In 2 Peter it is a synonym for the Second Coming and refers to the anticipated eschatological climax of events. Victory over darkness and sin will be achieved after God intervenes in the world with judgment and destruction to His enemies, and rewards and blessings to those who are in Christ.

Although this Day started with the resurrection of Christ and His victory over sin and the coming of the Spirit, it comes to its consummation and fullness after Christ’s Second Coming and Judgment (Isa. 2:11-20; 13:9-13; Joel 1:15; 3:14-21; Amos 5:18-20; 1 Thess. 2:1-3; 5:2).

 Basically, it means, no one has an excuse. Even in the wickedest of cities, the righteous people testified on behalf of God. God showed mercy upon mercy, until there was no hope for their repentance (Book of Jeremiah; Matt. 12:41; 23:13; Luke 12:47-48; Rom. 1:20-2:16).

  • Judgment is when God will overthrow every resistance of evil (1 Cor. 6:2-3; Matt. 25:31-46).
  • This also means a new world administrated by Christ that will replace the present one (2 Peter 3:13; Rev 21:1).
  • The judgment will bring the deeds of darkness to the Light (Isa. 29:15; 45:16-17).
  • Judgment is a part of the liberation of Christians who trust and obey God (Luke 18:1-8; 2 Thess. 1:5-10; Rev. 6:10).
  • Judgments were also against the kings and rulers who were evil and corrupt, especially those who claimed they were god (Isa. 5:14; 14:14-15; Jubilees 24:31, Jewish apocryphal book).

Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel called for judgment numerous times upon evil cities and their people who had fallen away, who refused to acknowledge God and His sovereignty, protection, and plan. The people in those cities would rather have sought false gods, and depending upon themselves, suffered and died, than have acknowledged God as Lord!

Has anything changed since Christ came? Only that we now have our Haven of Rest!

What is the point for us? We all are responsible to God, according to the election and Grace that we receive or reject (Matt 3:11-12; 24:29, 35; Luke 12:17 ff.; John 5:22; Rom. 2:12-16).

God is patient–as in long-suffering–in exercising judgment so that people may have the time and the chance to come to faith and repentance (Luke 13:6-9; Rom. 2:4; 2 Peter 3:9).

God is more concerned with our obedience than our knowledge. This is so essential for us to understand and apply!  What we think we know pales in comparison to who Christ is and what He does for us. When we feel we are wise, we are like a four-year-old thinking he knows better than his parents. How far can a four-year-old carry himself in life? How far can we carry ourselves in life without Christ?

We may think we are doing well, but when we look back, with eternity as our guide, our ways are revealed as very pathetic indeed! We need to allow God’s truth to reign in us, and hold on to that reign with trust and obedience. When we do this without worry, and with trust, we grow, and real wisdom will flow into us, and through us to those around us. Just be aware that God will not give you wisdom or gifts until you have mastered what He has already given you (Luke 16:10; 19:17; John 7:17; 14:12; Heb. 12:6)!

The good news and the main meaning for us is to heed Christ’s love, grace, and call, and that any evil power-past, present, or future-is not to be feared by us Christians! He is still in control. Even when the world seems to be in chaos and discord, He is there with us, ever faithful and still in charge. Our duty and call is to fix our eyes on Christ, not on the troubles. This is the key to dealing with suffering and when life does not seem to make sense (2 Cor. 4:18; Heb. 12:1-3).

 

Advertisements