What does Revelation 16:12-21 mean to us now?

 

Have you ever considered that God suffers from our sins? And, in the midst of our sin, He is patient? Yet, one day, His patience will come to its fruition; His judgments, which will be honorable and blameless, will come about. Remember that God’s wrath refers to the judgment that is coming; it will be a reality (Is. 65:2; Joel 2:11; Mal. 3:2). This is something we Christians need not fear as Christ covers our sin for us (Zeph. 1:14-18; Nahum. 1:6; Mal. 3:2; Rom. 1:18; 3:9-23; 6:23; 2 Pet. 3:9-15; Rev.19:15). God loves holiness and love, and both produce justice. He hates sin and discord. Without love expressed in holiness, there can be no justice or hope for the righteous and faithful. There is hope and assurance when our trust is in Christ and His righteousness. He is our hope, even when the very foundations of the universe are collapsing around and under us. When our hope is in Christ, nothing can shake us (Luke 12:32-34; 1 Cor. 7:29-31; 2 Thess. 1:7-9; Heb. 12:25-29; Rev. 6:16). 

Remember this very important point: sin and wrong desires, factions, and immorality bring us only “darkness.” Darkness refers to having no peace, contentment, or happiness; chasing evils and pleasure, even our wants, only leaves us destitute of what is really important. This can be in a family, in a nation, in the world, and even in the Church. Thus, a defiant heart will only bring pain, chaos, strife, disillusionment, dysfunction, discouragement, distress, and grief. So, who wants that? Remember, He will equip us with what He requires for us to live a triumphant, purpose-filled life (Is. 57:15-21; 59:1-21; 59:15-18; 65:1-15)! 

Questions to Ponder: 

  1. What did you think Armageddon or I will come like a thief were about prior to studying Revelation? What do you think now?
  1. These people who refuse to repent or seek Christ are in a battle of command and control! How do you think so?
  1. How do you feel that these images are not meant to terrify us, but show us how God works so we can beware and defend ourselves? So, how can you defend yourself or prepare?

 

  1. What can you do to better hold to your faith and watch for Christ without being sucked into the latest theories and fads of His return?
  1. How have you or do you seek to battle God, by thought or inaction? What about factions in your church? When we come against one another, are we actually battling God?

 © 2007 R. J. Krejcir Ph.D. Into Thy Word Ministries http://www.intothyword.org

 

The Four Main Views of Revelation 16:12-21

 

The Preterist view: They see this passage as the preparation of defeat for Jerusalem and/or Rome. Euphrates is a historical reference to being conquered by surprise (the way Cyrus conquered Babylon), and as a metaphor to show how God will bring judgment when we are not expecting it, either to Jerusalem in 70 A.D. or the fall of Rome. They also see this as fulfilling Daniel’s vision and the beginning of the Kingdom of God. The troops that took siege of Jerusalem, according to Josephus, came from the region of the Euphrates. Frogs are seen as unclean and represent unclean Jerusalem or the allies of the Roman armies, why God destroyed it, and who he used. Kings of the earth and Armageddon are seen as symbolic for God being “pregnant” with judgment and ready to give birth to it as Elijah demonstrated near the same location when he defeated the false prophets on Mt. Carmel. Others see it as the destruction of Jerusalem or Rome. Come like a thief is seen as surprise as the Jewish and/or Rome leadership led to their doom (Matt. 16:28). It is done is the anticipation and finality of Jerusalem or Rome. Babylon is often associated as Rome by the Early Church, hence the reason for this position along with Matt 16 and 24. Some in this camp see this as Jerusalem because of the apostasy. Hundred pounds is seen as the siege engines that Rome used. 

The Futurist view: They see this passage as the antichrist causing World War III and the details to this battle of Armageddon which they see as taking place (even though Scripture may tell us otherwise). They see God removing the Euphrates so Russia and China can attack Israel. Kings of the earth/east is seen as the literal attack of the Orient and/or China, or the Middle East collectively, and the rise of a new world order—a singular, oppressive government. Frogs are seen as modern war machines. (What would a tank look like to John?) This is correlated to Daniel 11: 40-45. Come like a thief is seen as a post-tribulation rapture or the coming of Christ. The seventh bowl is seen as the destruction of Satan and his minion. The Earthquakes are seen as nuclear war or a literal earthquake beyond measure. Babylon is seen as having been rebuilt and then destroyed, or the evil, spiritual, religious system under judgment. Hail is seen as literal or military ordnances. 

The Idealist view: They see this passage as the fears of the Seven Churches for the pending Parthian invasion. Others see this as Nero’s suicide and the upheavals that occurred for the early Church that led to the escalation of persecution until Rome was Christianized and finally judged. Others at that time saw this as Nero coming back for vindication to the Church (Nero Redivivus myth). Others see this as the fall of Rome by the invasion of the Barbarians for the western kingdom and the Parthian invasion for the eastern kingdom.  Euphrates symbolizes obstruction and how it will be removed fugitively. Kings of the earth/east is seen as our fight against God, our ways versus His Way. Come like a thief is seen as Christ returning and how unexpected it will be. Armageddon and the rest of the imagery is a representation of slaughter as in the judgments of God upon the wicked who refuse to repent. 

The Historicist view: They see this passage as the Turks invading former Rome and the preceding southern European powers. Euphrates was a symbol for Turks and Muslim invaders from the fall of Rome until the 19th century. Others see this as God’s judgment on the corrupt papacy in the 16th through the 18th centuries. The river being dried up is their power coming to an end and the rise of the Reformation. Others see this as the decline of the power of the Turks in the early 19th century. Frogs and demons are seen as the wars and turmoil of the 18th through 19th centuries in Europe. Armageddon is seen as a symbol for conflict such as “The Great War,” WW I and/or our spiritual conflicts. They agree with the futurists that the seventh bowl has not been poured out yet. This is the final, climatic end of humanity and its fight against God. Others see it as a future conflict with Russia and the west, because another name for Russia is “Gog;” or, it could be the conflicts of the papal kingdoms, the Holy Roman Empire of past. Earthquakes and the other imagery are seen as man’s political powers and kingdoms clashing and coming to an end before Christ’s return. Babylon, in this view, is seen as Catholic Rome; splitting into three is seen as the final end of the papacy.

Exegetical look into Revelation 16:15-21

 

  • Come like a thief. A popular image of the last days, this refers to being prepared because one does not know when such things will come about. What are we to prepare with? Philippians 1 tells us, by faith and maturity! It is not by infighting and speculation!
  • Stays awake means that the guards, at their post, protected people, but could not if they fell asleep.
  • Keeps his clothes with him means vigilance and preparedness, and a representation of shame. Most people in that culture slept in the nude when it was warm, but would be horrified to be seen that way in public; to run out of your house naked would be great shame, even if chasing a thief (Gen 3:7; Is. 47:3; Ezek. 16:37; Hab. 2:16; Eph. 6; Rev. 3:3, 18).
  • They gathered. This theme is deeply rooted in Old Testament prophecy; God will gather them to judgment for their own self destruction. This is also a reinforcement that God is the head of the armies (1 Sam. 17:45; Is. 13:4; Jer. 50:29; Joel 3:2-11; Zeph. 3:8; Zech. 12:3; 14:2).
  • Into the air. In context, this perhaps means a “theophany,” an explicit manifestation of God, or, at the very least, a reference to God’s Glory (Ex. 19:16; Rev. 4:5).
  • It is done. References John 19:30.
  • Earthquake…. every island fled away. An image of the end of the age. But, those in Christ the ROCK will not be shaken (Matt. 7:24-25; Heb. 12:26-28; Rev. 6:12-14; 11:13; 20:11).
  • God remembered Babylon. This is not of favor, rather of vindication and wrath. This is God’s response to the cries of the oppressed. This image is the key metaphor associated with Christ’s Second Coming (Psalm 137:7; Is. 51:22-23; Rev. 14:9-10; 19:11-21).
  • Mountains could not be found. This means the incredible, vast devastation and the end of the world as we know it. These people deserved their just reward—extreme punishment (Ex. 7:22; Rev. 16:9).
  • Huge hailstones. Such a catastrophe causes total devastation like ordnance shells. This delays the plans of man and the battle of Armageddon has to wait for another time (Ex. 9:24-27; Is. 28:17; Ezek. 38:17-23; Rev. 6:12-17; 7:1-3; 19:11-21).
  • Hundred pounds/talent refers to being very heavy, causing great upheaval and disaster.

What does “Armageddon” really mean?

Armageddon!? 

This passage, Revelation 16:16, is the only place in Scripture that this term occurs. Today, this is a popular image of a great climatic battle—WW III and the end of all things. But is this what it really means? Most people do and if you do, you are wrong! 

This is actually an image or metaphor of command and control! It means extreme conflict and judgment, a representation of the overthrow of Satan and evil by God; thus, it is not necessarily a geographic reference. 

In the first century, it was a Hebrew transliteration (Har-Magedon) meaning “the gathering place of the crowd” for the “mount of Megiddo,” which was actually a plane near Jerusalem’s southern border, with a small up-rise that was a lookout and later became a fort. This was significant in ancient times as it was the key intersection for a small corridor that was the main road near the coast as an alternative to a more difficult road through the mountains and desert. It was also the “Road to Damascus.” This was the key junction of trade among Egypt, Europe, Mesopotamia, and the rest of the East and Africa, all coming through this narrow passageway. This mount overlooks the valley of Jezreel, called the “Plane of Esdraelon” in John’s time, where massive armies would converge and battle it out, as they did when the Barbarians and others engaged Rome’s interests in Israel. Thus, this image was well known and experienced. This is a key military outpost; whomever controlled this mount controlled the valley and thus controlled trade and wealth of the then known world! 

So the real issue of this term in this context is this: Who has command of you and your church? Is it pride, trends, and agendas, or is it God and His preeminence? This was the prime message to the Seven Churches (Judges 5:19; 6:33; 1 Sam. 31; 2 Kings 9:27; 2 Chron. 35:20 -25; Is. 24; Joel 3:2; Zech. 12:8-14; Rev. 13:1; 17:1-9; 16:16; 19:11-21)!

Exegetical look into Revelation 16:12-14

 

  • Euphrates was a symbol for defeat like Napoleon’s great defeat at Waterloo, and an image of drying up as the Red Sea did. This was the border of Rome to Parthian; where Armenia was located was also the border. If something disrupted the flow, such as drought or catastrophe, great armies could cross easily; if not, it was a slow, audacious crossing, on rafts. This was the area where Cyrus and the Persians conquered Babylon in 536 B.C. and set the stage for the Jews’ second exodus back to the Promised Land. Cyrus diverted the flow of the river so his armies could cross. This maneuver was considered an impossibly and hence, the place was not guarded. The Babylonians were surprised—caught with their pants down—as Cyrus sneaked into the great city where the river flowed partly underground. David did something similar when he conquered Jerusalem (Ex. 14:21-22; Josh. 3:9-17; 4:22-24; 2 Sam. 5:1-8; Rev. 9:14; 17:15-18:24).
  • Was dried up to prepare refers to no delay—easy passage for an army in contrast to the Euphrates which was also a symbol for difficulty. This also is an image of the exodus and restoration as the parting of the Red Sea or the Jews leaving their Babylonian captivity and retuning to Israel. It is an image of restoration for the faithful and military oppression for the wicked.
  • Kings from the East. Most assume this means invaders from anywhere east of Israel, and it well could be. Others see this as “fallen angels” However, for a first century Jew, this clearly meant the Parthians who were the most feared enemy of Rome and directly in their path was the province of Asia Minor and the churches there.
  • Three evil spirits/devils gives an image from the apocalyptic book, 2 Baruch, and tells of demons that cause havoc prior to the end of days.  It refers to demons and how they can be God’s agents to do His bidding and judgment (James 2:19).
  • Frogs were images of evil or what is bad and wrong, as they are “unclean” animals, and also an allusion to the plagues of Egypt. Popular thinking then was Nero would be reincarnated as a frog for his sins. This can also mean deception that tricks people to seek evil and not good (Ex. 8:5-7; Lev 11:10; Luke 10:18-19; apocalyptic book War Scroll from the Dead Sea Scrolls; 4 Ezera).
  • Miraculous signs refers to deception and false prophets (Deut. 13:1-3; Matt. 24:24; 2 Thess. 2:9; Rev 19:20) 
  • Kings of the whole world.  Perhaps a different set of people from kings of the east; these are the armies who seek to wage war even against God (1 Sam. 8:4-18; Rev. 6:15; 19:11-21).
  • Great day of God means God’s judgment will be complete and perfect and not have any social class or economic barriers to it. God vindicates us! It is judgment time for those people who are unjust and evil oppressors (Rev. 13:13; 19:11-21).
  • Gather/assemble them for the battle. This was a metaphor for Judgment. The nations of earth actually think they can battle God! It is a scene for the evils of the world to fight against God metaphorically as we all do from time to time, or to the extreme of cursing God till you die.  This is also an image of God confronting the forces of evil, the battle against of good versus evil, our personal battle of sin. This is also, in context to the Seven Churches, our personalities, ways, pride, and agendas converging and conflicting for the battle for the Church—His ways or ours in our lust for command and control of His Church. This, of course, is also the reference to a future, perhaps, actual eschatological battle, that is prepared for and staged just before Christ returns (Ex. 15:2; Is. 43:9; Joel 3:2-11; Zeph. 3:8; Ezek. Chaps 38-39; Rev. 2:10-13; 6:12-17; 17:13-14; 19:11-21; 20:7-10).
  • Great day of God Almighty day of the Lord. Almighty refers to God’s omnipotence and His “All,” as in supremacy and preeminence. As a phrase, this was also a metaphor for Judgment (Amos 5:18-20; 2 Cor. 6:18; 1 Thess. 5:2).

Revelation 16:12-21: What are the Contexts?

 

This passage closes the cycle of judgments, and the imagery tells how the world is set-up for the Second Coming of Christ (Is. 51:17-22; Jer. 25:15-29; Lam. 4:21; Ezek. 23:31-34; Hab. 2:16; 2 Pet. 3:9-15; 1 John 2:28; Rev. 3:1-6; 14:10; 15:1; 16:19)! In contrast, this is also about how God cares for His faithful and vindicates us from those who do evil and oppress us. These images are not meant to terrify us, but to show us how God works; then, we can beware and defend ourselves by exercising the precepts found in this letter as the early church did prior to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. 

God’s is totally fair! His judgments are pure and righteous; there is no fault or wrong with Him or His plan. Those who sin do so willfully, and when they refuse His grace and redemption they get what they want—His judgment (Psalm 97:2). Humanity has no right or argument to accuse or fight against God. Yet, within His judgments are His love and promises for those who are faithful; His love even extends in Judgment by giving the wicked what they want—separation from Him and His goodness. This is a call for the wicked to take heed and repent—or else. This is also a call for us to be ready for His glorious and wondrous return!

 

Revelation 16:12-21

Introduction 

The Final Bowls of God’s Wrath 

Now, the rest of the judgment bowls are poured out. The sixth angel pours his out upon the Euphrates River and it dries up, giving an open passage for the armies of the east to march on. Then, evil sprits come from the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet, and instigate war. These are the ones who manipulated the political powers of the earth to battle against the Lord, thinking they could prevent judgment with their feeble military might and pride. Now, Jesus Himself speaks, saying, I will come like a thief, unexpectedly. Be blessed all those who hold to faith and watch for Me and not defile themselves with the filth of sin or expose themselves to the evil manipulators or find themselves ashamed of their faith in Me

            The nations gather for war at Armageddon. Then, the seventh angel pours out his bowl into the air and shouting that it is all finished. Thunder and lightening, earthquakes, and a great hail storm rumble far greater than ever before in history. The city of Babylon is split into three pieces and falls to rubble for its sin. The judgments continue as mountains collapse and islands disappear into the deep. What do the people and armies do? The people remain defiant and wicked, and instead of repenting as they had each time before, they curse God! 

This passage testifies to the readiness of Christ’s return. They question is, are you ready? What does it mean to be ready? What do you need to do to prepare for Him?

What does Revelation 12:13-17 mean to us now?

What does Revelation 12:13-17 mean to us now? 

Real spiritual warfare has more to do with the battle of the will. Rarely will we see the fire and brimstone that we expect; rather, we see what we want to see. Our will is the prime motivator; our needs are motivators and our desires are agendas. God’s precepts are there, perhaps even known to us, but they go unheeded, unapplied, and/or unused. God’s desire is for us to be formed in Jesus Christ, and in Him as Lord. Satan wants us to be centered on anything but that; he wants us disobedient and distorted to the things of God, and God wants us surrendered and dependant with faith upon Him. This is the battle, where the line is drawn, where what we choose will determine whether we serve Satan or Christ. There is no in-between, no middle ground, and no other choice for us to undertake. 

If Satan can’t deceive us, he will resort to anything that works—from persecutions to being overworked and having no time for our Lord. Satan will even fill our schedule with good things to keep us distracted from the ultimate good of growing in our faith and being a positive influence of Christ to others. So, watch out how you are being used, how your time is allocated. If you think you are doing well by keeping the kids very busy in sports and all kinds of great activities, but there is no time for church or the things of faith, how good are your good works? When the main call and work is misplaced and forgone, you may be being deceived by Satan and rationalizing it. Be in prayer that your deeds are lined up to biblical character and precepts and not of your will and the ways of the world. Or else, we will be advocates of Satan rather than ambassadors of Christ. The devil is in the details; are you in our Lord (2 Cor. 5:20)? 

Keep in mind that Satan’s role is to take and steal, and God’s role is for us to build and grow. Satan doesn’t want us to have what he has freely given up himself and cannot have back such as intimacy with God, ever abundant love,   triumphant life, goodness, and purpose with relationships that glorify Christ. Satan wants all the glory for himself. 

He seeks for us to have rotten relationships, emptiness and purposeless lives of despair filled with anger, betrayal, and hopelessness. He says we can have fun and fulfillment, but just think it through; how much fun is losing and taking what we do not earn only to have it rot and be meaningless or going from one meaningless activity to the next looking for a “high” and satisfaction that never comes? We can have satisfaction in Christ and His abundance infusing us—something that Satan once had but rejected, and he fervently hates all those who have it and excel in Him! So, beware to his ways—how he wants us to hate, disguising it with misplaced emotions, confusion, and hurt, so we are taken away from our family, our opportunities neutered or push aside, and our fullness in Christ ridiculed, replaced with what is fleeting, hurtful, and meaningless. 

            Christ wants you triumphant in your Christian life and seeks to save you and give you what you need so you can grow and have meaning and abundance of life. In contrast, Satan wants you to be miserable and dysfunctional; he seeks to take away anything that can help you to have what he has given up. Why would anyone fall for Satan’s methods? But, we can take heart and assurance in Christ that Satan has been defeated; he has lost, and he can’t have you or your church unless you give it to him by seeking him and not HIM. The bottom line is this: Satan can easily manipulate and destroy us. We have no chance or hope against his ancient wisdom and power. However, when we are in Christ, he does not have a chance against us! Satan can easily handle us, but he can’t handle HIM! 

Questions to Ponder: 

  1. Why does Satan seek to seduce us away from God by any means? What is his goal and purpose? How has God shown you Satan’s depravity, stupidity and desperateness?
  1. How has Christ’s victory over Satan influenced outcomes in your Christian life? How would you explain the consequences for Satan and those who follow him?
  1. How does real, spiritual warfare have more to do with the battle of will than our personally battling Satan? Why do most Christians seem to just expect fire and brimstone? What are some other things that we should expect?
  1. How has Satan sought to keep God’s Word out of reach or in the dark? Has he been overt or just caused you to neglect? How can we discern between Satan’s influences and our own depravity or laziness?
  1. What can be done to help prevent your church from being negatively influenced? What should the Church do about this continual threat? How can you watch out for how you are being used and how your time is allocated so you are serving God and not the ways of the Dragon?

© 2006 R. J. Krejcir Ph.D. Into Thy Word Ministries http://www.intothyword.org

The Four Main Views of Revelation 12:13-17

 

The Preterist view: They see this passage as the continuance of verse 12:6 and show analogies of the escape of the Christians and pious Jews from the Jewish revolt and the counter Roman invasions of Jerusalem in 68-70AD. Most Christians escaped to other providences while some hid in the desert and caves near the Dead Sea, but all Christians were saved; none perished, which was quite a miracle (Dan. 7:21-22; Matt. 24:15-28). They see a contrast of the serpent that crawls and the Church that flies on wings, that resonates the Exodus. The flood is seen as human persecutions against the Church and the campaigns of Satan to destroy the people of God. In contrast, God protects, delivers, and helps provide the resources and guidance for the Church to persevere. They see “offspring” as the Gentile converts in the Early Church, and “spiritual Israel” as those of faith and not just of lineage. 

The Futurist view: They see this passage as the result of Satan’s defeat and his being cast down to earth where he pursues the woman. Basically, they see this as adding more details to verses 12:1-6. Some see this as literal, and others see the imagery of the Exodus in relation to the last days and that God provides. Most see the flood as a literal event that Satan and/or the antichrist uses to flush out the righteous, the refuges in hiding. Others see this as false teachings in the last days as referenced in 2 Peter, or the armies of the antichrist, which while descending on Jerusalem to exterminate the Jews, is frustrated or stopped as God opens the earth and swallows them. Then the “offspring” are those who testify to Christ; Satan and/or the antichrist, turns the attention to them. 

The Idealist view: They see this passage as a testament of the Devil’s defeat and his rage to attack the Church on earth. The woman represents the Church as it spreads into the world, giving birth to the Church Age and Satan’s opposition against it as well as the opposition of corruption and apostasy. The wing of eagles is seen as the Exodus, and the protection of God on His Church. The flood is seen as all the human efforts, such as Islam, internal corruption, cults, false teaching, pseudoscience, and philosophy opposing the Church. 

The Historicist view: They see this passage as metaphor, that the flight of the woman is the downfall of true spirituality and piety in the Church. Others see Satan’s role as influencing the Catholic papacy and/or the Dragon is the papacy (Popes). Others see his role as to subvert and oppress the great doctrines of Augustine and others, and/or spiritual warfare to the individual faithful. The “wings of eagles,” focusing on the word two is seen as western and eastern divisions of the Church. The “earth opened” is seen as the downfall of Rome, while others see this as the persecutions through the ages against the Church. The flight in to the desert is seen as God’s protection of the Church’s faithful. Some in this camp date this age to 256 to 1514, between the beginnings of the fall of Rome and the start of Reformation.

Exegetical look into Revelation 12:13-17

 

  • Pursued/persecuted the woman: The meaning here is to “eagerly seek after, to pursue, to harass, cause trouble, molest.” Satan is being represented as creating and using deceit to trick and deceive people of faith and those who could be so (2 Thess. 2:9-10; Rev. 13:1-10).
  • Two wings of a great eagle: Shows the plight of the Exodus and how God guides, protects, shelters and cares for His people (Ex. 19; Deut. 32:11; Psalm 17:8; 36:7; 57:1; 61:4; 91:4; Is. 40: Jer. 49:22).
  • Fly to the place prepared: Indicates that God prepares and then comes through to deliver His people from their oppressors. Remember, Revelation is a book about God’s grace and protection just as much as it is about condemnation and last days.
  • Desert: Means a place that is deprived of aid and protection, a solitary, lonely, desolate, place. Here, it refers to God providing the manna for the people of the Exodus while they were in a desolate environment. In context, it shows the grace and hand of God as He cares and provides for His people. In the midst of dire circumstances, we have a God who not only cares, He is involved!
  • Be taken care: Meaning God’s provision to bring up, to nourish, and to support. This, in context, is also the expression of how Christ’s work delivers us and enters us into His Kingdom as well as protects us in spiritual warfare (Rom. 8:12-17; Eph. 6:10-18).
  • Or a time, times and half a time: Refers to the three and a half years of Daniel. Also stated as 1,260 days in the idioms and language of the early Church and Jewish community, and was colloquial for the period of time from the finished work of Christ until He comes back. This is the period in which the Church has been since its inception, where we are now at this writing. This is also shown in the context, as 12:1-6 shows Christ’s exaltation, while 12:10 shows His salvation to us; in 12:11-17 the Church is shown in the world with faith and persecutions, then Christ returns to slay the Dragon. This encompass the Church Age (Dan. 7:25; 12:7; Rev. 4:32).
  • Out of the serpent’s reach/face: Protected from the deception, cunning, wisdom, and the outward appearance of evil. The application to this term is that we can tolerate all things with Christ!
  • From his mouth: Meaning the “edge of a sword,” as the utterance of thoughts to cause harm.
  • Spewed water…to overtake: Means a flood or war and refers to being overwhelmed and carried away. This is a theme of judgment (Psalm 32:6; 69:15; Jer. 47:2).
  • Sweep her away. This passage is a parallel to the Exodus.
  • The earth helped/hid. For the Jewish audience, this meant that God sometimes uses His creation to intervene on behalf of others, such as the earth opening and swallowing Korah and his wicked men, the tree that hid Isaiah, and Jonah and the great fish. This is also an illustration from the Greek story of “Leto and Apollo,” where the sea god hid and provided for Leto, and protecting her from a dragon so she could bear a child. The image here is that God protects and promises safety just as he did with the Exodus (Gen. 4:10; Num. 16:30-33; Is. 43:2; 53:7-8).
  • Enraged: Satan is mad because he did not get his way and definitely does not want us to have His Way!
  • Make war: How Satan produces and constructs quarrels and battles us fervently. He seeks to destroy and mislead us into thinking we do not need God. And, if his tricks do not work he will do all he can for as long as he can to destroy us. But, the great news in this passage is, we do not just have a great Referee, we have God on our side! Satan wants us to do his bidding, deceiving us along the way, but he can do nothing that God does not allow and he can’t do anything against the strength and resources that Christ gives us.
  • Offspring/seed: Means the descendents of Eve and more to the point believers who will obey God, and the one who will crush the serpents head. It refers to the people of God, Christians saved by faith. Christ also defeats Satan, but Satan, as prophesied, will bruise His and our heel (Gen. 3).
  • Who keep/obey: This infers that those of faith have received their faith from Christ; thus, we resound to observe, attend, and carefully take care of His precepts and what He gives us. Keep in mind that there are conditions—not to our salvation other that to receive it by faith—but conditions under which to grow in our faith and service to Him. We have to have faith, we have to be saved in Christ, and we have to respond to Christ, being proactive with our faith in our situations, producing Fruit and character, not sitting and doing nothing.
  • Testimony of Jesus: This refers to the testimony that Jesus bore by His work and involvement. Christ’s blood and sacrifice prevails when we accept it and us it as our main artillery. Our unwavering faith in Christ, by whom and what He has done is too much for Satan to handle; he can’t stand against the goodness of Christ. Thus, when we are in Christ, we prevail; Satan has already lost and has been defeated (Rev. 1:2, 9; 19:10).